Children

Two out of three Ukrainian children need help – DW – 01/06/2022

This Wednesday (01/06) has been celebrated in several countries, there is no reason to celebrate Children’s Day in Ukraine. According to data released by the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF), at least 5.2 million Ukrainian children are in need of humanitarian assistance due to the war being waged by Russia.

There are a total of 3 million children in the territory of Ukraine and another 2.2 million have taken refuge in other countries. That is, more than two-thirds of Ukraine’s 7.5 million minors – or two out of three children – have been displaced by the war and are now dependent on humanitarian aid.

Since the start of the conflict, which lasted 98 days on Wednesday, at least 262 children have been killed and 415 injured, mainly due to explosive attacks in populated areas, including the destruction or damage to critical infrastructure, such as hundreds of children. Education centers and health units.

According to the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights, an average of two children are killed and more than four are injured every day in Ukraine. Last week, the United Nations updated the number of civilians killed in the war to 4,000.

In a statement issued on Wednesday, UNICEF warned that the war was “causing devastating consequences for children at a level and pace not seen since World War II”.

In the text, Katherine Russell, Executive Director of UNICEF, highlights that “the war has destroyed the lives of millions of children. Without an immediate ceasefire and peace talks, children will continue to suffer, on the other hand conflict will result. Weak children around the world will be affected.”

The UN fund further stressed that children fleeing the war in Ukraine could be at serious risk of family separation as well as at risk for violence, abuse and sexual exploitation and fall into the trap of human trafficking.

The United Nations estimates that at least 262 children have died in the conflict so far, with an average of more than two victims per day.Photo: Arthur Vidak / Nurfoto / Photo Alliance

UNICEF’s warning comes largely because, according to the entity, most of the children who are suffering in the war have been traumatized. The fund said humanitarian assistance should focus on safety, stability, child protection services and psychosocial support, “especially for those who are unaccompanied or separated from their families.”

To date, UNICEF has provided assistance to more than 610,000 children and individuals involved in psychosocial care. But the agency has requested at least 48 948 million from the international community for humanitarian response in Ukraine and in countries hosting Ukrainian refugees.

Ukraine is investigating war crimes

Ukraine’s judiciary has identified “thousands” of alleged war crimes since Russia invaded the country, according to figures released on Tuesday. Ukraine’s Attorney General Irina Venediktova made the announcement during a visit to The Hague in the Netherlands.

On this occasion, Venedictova met with Karim Khan, the prosecutor of the International Criminal Court (ICC), and Ladislav Hamran, the president of Eurojust – Eurojust is a European organization that deals with judicial co-operation between the member states of the European Union.

“Based on what we see in Donbass, we’ve identified thousands of cases,” the attorney general told a news conference.

In all, according to Venediktova, Ukraine has already identified 15,000 cases of alleged war crimes, which, according to Ukrainians, include forced deployment, torture, killing of civilians and destruction of civilian infrastructure in various parts of Russia.

Venediktova added that between 100 and 200 reports of war crimes attributed to the Russian military appear daily.

Also on Tuesday, a Ukrainian court sentenced two Russian soldiers to 11-and-a-half years in prison for carrying out multiple missile strikes on two villages in the northeastern region of Kharkiv.

gb (Efe, DPA, ots)

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