Sports

‘Satch’ Sanders shares his thoughts on the Celtics’ run for the NBA Finals

Tom “Satch” Sanders knows a thing or two about what it takes to win the NBA Basketball Hall of Famer has won eight titles in 13 years with the Boston Celtics (1960-73), often overlooking major enemy threats. As for the Celtics’ run in the NBA Finals, Sanders is very impressed with the stability of the team. “The team seems to like playing basketball, like playing together, and it’s very difficult for us to get along.” The Celtics have shown a lot of power on the road in this road, going 7-2 away from TD Garden before. NBA finals. Boston extended their record with their Game 1 victory over the Golden State Warriors in San Francisco. But when it came to home games, the Celtics were just 5-4 at TD Garden to enter the NBA Finals. Sanders, however, does not think home history has anything to do with how the team is playing so hard in Boston. “When you are on the road for a break, you have nothing to do but think about why you are there. , it could be anything, it could be a compulsion, it could be a parent discussion, it could be a wife, children. it could be a lot of friends saying: ‘What are you guys doing tonight? It can be any kind of stress and external stress. ” Sanders said in his playing days, he enjoyed the idea of ​​going to a place of violence and restraining a lot of people. “It’s fun,” he said. “It’s always fun to play and say: ‘Did you guys make fun of me? Did you call me some names? Here, get this!’ After spending his days playing with the Celtics, Sanders coached the Harvard University basketball team for four seasons (1973-77), becoming the first black man to become a head coach in every sport in the Ivy League. He later joined the C’s as an assistant coach in 1977 before becoming a full-time head coach in 1978. Sanders co-founded several NBA player programs, including the Rookie Transition Program in the league in 1968. The NBA Rookie Transition Program was the first. such a program in any major American game.

Tom “Satch” Sanders knows a thing or two that is needed to win an NBA tournament.

The Basketball Hall of Famer has won eight titles in 13 years with the Boston Celtics (1960-73), often overseeing the most dangerous opponents of the opposition.

When it came to the Celtics’ running for the NBA Finals, Sanders was impressed with the team’s stability.

“Not really happy, scared, nervous or anything. Any words, it doesn’t work,” Sanders said. “This team looks like they like to play basketball, like playing together, and it’s very difficult to get along.”

The Celtics have shown a lot of strength along the way after this season, going 7-2 away from TD Garden ahead of the NBA Finals. Boston lifted the record with their Game 1 victory over the Golden State Warriors in San Francisco.

But when it comes to playing at home, the Celtics are just 5-4 at TD Garden entering the NBA Finals. Sanders, however, does not think home history is associated with a team playing hard in Boston.

“The fact that they are not doing well at home is not related to the problems at home. Let’s say this, “he said. “When you are on the road for a break, you have nothing to do but think about why you are there. , it can be anything, it can be pressure, it can be parental communication, it can be parenting, it can be a wife, children.

Sanders said that during his playing days, he enjoyed the idea of ​​going to a place of violence and restraining people.

“It’s always fun,” he said. “It’s always fun to play and say: ‘Did you guys make fun of me? Did you call me some names? Here, get this!’

After his days playing with the Celtics, Sanders coached the Harvard University basketball team for four seasons (1973-77), becoming the first black man to become the head coach of every sport in the Ivy League. He later joined C as an assistant in 1977 before becoming a senior head coach in 1978.

Sanders co-founded several NBA player programs, including the Rookie Transition Program in the league in 1968. The NBA Rookie Transition Program was the first such program in any major American game.

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