Sports

Gay baseball expert Bryan Ruby talks about the Rays Pride patch controversy

One baseball player is speaking out following the idea of ​​several Tampa Bay Rays players not wearing the rainbow logo on their “Pride Night” uniform in support of the LGBTQ + team.

Bryan Ruby, an athlete and musician who publicly appeared to be gay last year, recently told USA Today that the behavior shown “sends a clear message” that “LGBTQ people are not welcome here.”

“A lot of guys don’t know what they’ve always had, and they continue to have gay or lesbian friends. Such old-fashioned language and behavior hurts the team. It’s hard to be gay in baseball,” Ruby said.

Rays pitchers Jason Adam, Jalen Beeks, Brooks Raley, Jeffrey Springs and Ryan Thompson were among the players who chose not to wear rainbow patches, while Adam referred to the idea as “faith”.

Bryan Ruby has spoken out following a ruling by several Tampa Bay Rays players not to wear a rainbow logo on their uniforms in support of the Pride Night.
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Details of the rainbow logo of the Tampa Bay Rays to celebrate the Proud Month in a game against the Chicago White Sox.
Details of the rainbow logo of the Tampa Bay Rays to celebrate the Proud Month in a game against the Chicago White Sox.
Getty Images

“It’s what we believe to be the life that he (Jesus) encouraged us to live, to benefit, not to give up,” Adam told the Tampa Bay Times. “Also, we love these men and women, we care about them and we want them to be safe and welcome here.”

Ruby argued, however, that the meaning of the message could be interpreted differently.

“It always amazes me when boys use Jesus as an excuse to discriminate against me,” Ruby later added, “but this is not about religion. This is about being a good friend. When the boys go to make a point against the Night of Pride, they send a clear message that people like me are not welcome in baseball. It is a reminder that even on one proud night at a football stadium, we are still second citizens. It’s as simple as that. ”

Ruby, who helped create the nonprofit LGBTQ + support team, Proud to Be In Baseball, added how things send a disturbing message that players can’t be real due to lack of support.

Details of the pride of the Tampa Bay Rays explode mark the celebration of the Pride Month in a game against the Chicago White Sox.
Details of the pride of the Tampa Bay Rays explode mark the celebration of the Pride Month in a game against the Chicago White Sox.
Getty Images
Bryan Ruby helped form the nonprofit support team Proud To Be In baseball
Bryan Ruby helped form the nonprofit support team Proud To Be In baseball.
Facebook / Bryan Ruby
Bryan Ruby is described as a freshman on the Proud To Be In Baseball's page
Bryan Ruby is described as a freshman on the Proud To Be In Baseball’s page.
Facebook / Bryan Ruby

“When your teammates do things that show they don’t approve of you, it can be very painful, and obviously very difficult to get along with and play well,” said Ruby, who last year played for the Salem-Keizer Volcanoes. of the Mavericks Independent baseball League. “What about the young players who dream of one day shooting in the big leagues? Once you get there, you can have your dreams but only if you hide from the world that you are real? It’s sad and frustrating to know that guys many others like me are not allowed to walk on egg shells in the shadows of a culture that still remembers the world of ‘Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell’ that we have to go through ten years ago. ”

In addition to Ruby, Cardinals pitcher Jack Flaherty also tore the Rays apart amid growing controversy.

Elsewhere, Nick Anderson of the Rays gave a message of encouragement to his friendstweeting, “It’s strange to me that people do not understand that there are different religions. And just because you have different beliefs, in any way, form, or form does not mean that you despise that person or think he is inferior. You can love everyone and have beliefs. different. ”

Anderson sent a lengthy message Monday following his first tweet.

“When I say ‘religion,’ I mean ‘people who believe that everyone should wear something and that if you don’t wear it, you should be burned out and that you are a bad person or whatever you want to call them. I also said that just because you do not wear the patch does not mean that you think that people should be burned out and that they are bad people. Come on everyone, “he wrote.

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